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“Excluded from History” No More: Inclusive Inquiry to Support Both Research and Teaching By Jenny Cox Jenny Cox wrote the article “Advancing Equitable and Responsible Research Involving Gender and Sexuality within Mathematics Education” in the latest quarterly issue of The Educational Forum . The article is available free in the month of June. In a recent article, Helen Forgasz (2021) included a refreshingly honest anecdote about “listwise deleting” students who had failed to respond to the “Are you male or female?” survey item in her early 1990s doctoral study. Terminology related to gender and sexuality has certainly changed ...
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Policy for Practice: Expanding Our Field of Vision By Simona Goldin Simona Goldin and David K. Cohen wrote the article “ How Teachers Might Have Taught but Most Didn’t , and Why ” in the latest quarterly issue of  The Educational Forum.  The article is   available free in the month of  June. When David K. Cohen and I wrote How Teachers Might Have Taught, but Most D idn’t , and Why , we were no strangers to the persistent failure of school reform . Point of fact, in Cohen’s article, “ Teaching Practice: Plus Ca Change ” (1988), he illustrates important reasons for ...
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Breaking Down the Classroom Walls: A Journey into Co-Teaching and Interdisciplinary Instruction in Teacher Preparation By Brandon Butler and Stephen Burgin For many, teaching can be an isolating experience. You teach behind closed doors, often with little interaction with other adults during instructional time. One exception can be found when you are assigned an instructional aide or co-teacher, who is often present to support the learning of English Language Learning or students with disabilities. Even in schools where collaborative planning is the norm, collaborative instruction —particularly among teachers of ...
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What Does it Mean to be a Teacher Educator in Today’s Rapidly Changing World? by Adrian D. Martin, Ph.D. Those of us who work in the teaching profession often focus on our engagement with students. We think about how students interact with us, how they interact with each other, and how this supports their learning. It might be fair to say that the central (and perhaps most important) relationship in classrooms and schools is the one between the educator and their pupils. Throughout my previous years as an early childhood and primary teacher and now, as a teacher educator, I have approached my work and my professional responsibilities ...
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Real World Impact: Lessons Learned Through Studying an Early Warning Dropout Prevention Program in Washington State High Schools by Dr. David Knight and Dr. Julia Duncheon What is the role of university researchers in improving public education systems? As members of an applied field, effective education scholars explore beyond their labs and university campuses. The idea that educational research should impact policy and practice, and that researchers can partner with practitioners to facilitate this work, is not new. Yet, ongoing collaborative work poses new challenges, and education researchers have an important role to play ...
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In Pursuit of Equity for Multilingual Students in Mathemetics: What Do Teachers Need Support In? by Am elia Q. Rivera and Samantha A. Marshall As school bells ring across the country, classrooms are filled with children eager to learn. Unfortunately, not every student will have equitable opportunities to learn, particularly when students’ native ways of speaking don’t align with the language of instruction. Teacher professional development to effectively support multilingual students is rarely a priority, especially in math classrooms where common phrases like “math is a universal language,” oversimplify ...
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Smart Is a Costume That Not Everyone Is Allowed to Wear: A dis/abled educator’s reflections on how whiteness and ableism shape our expectations by Autumn Wilke How do you recognize and define smartness? Who decides what a smart student looks, sounds, and acts like in educational settings? I have worked in higher education since 2009 and the bulk of my professional experience has been in offices supporting academic success or advancing access for students with dis/abilities. These roles, along with my own identity and experiences as a dis/abled learner and educator have often led to me questioning the expected, ...
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Implementation of Social Inclusion to Support Refugee Students’ Well-Being in Victoria, Australia: A Study of School Reports and Policies by Huu Loc Nguyen and Ahmed Bawa Kuyini Refugees leave their home countries to seek safety and escape from wars, political and religious oppressions. Embarking on an odyssey of finding a better place full of challenges and uncertainties, they bring with them families and their children. To the young people’ eyes, it is a journey of changes, disruption, adaptation, fitting in, and finding a sense of belonging in their new “home.” In this journey, the question of “where do I belong” comes naturally to many refugee ...
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Social Justice Leadership: The Backbone in Inquiry-Based and Transformative Education by Lucijan Jović As Nelson Mandella once said, “education is the most powerful weapon with which we can use to change the world.” Schools are a place where students are prepared for post-secondary education and the workforce. In addition, schools serve as a place where students craft their identities. Rich learning fuels students’ intrinsic motivation to become proficient readers, writers, speakers, and critical thinkers. The goal is to foster civic and engaged individuals who will not only make positive contributions to society but ...
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By Sharon McDonough and Narelle Lemon Dr. McDonough is a researcher in teacher education with advanced disciplinary knowledge of sociocultural theories of teacher emotion, resilience, and wellbeing. Sharon brings these to explore how best to prepare and support teachers for entry into the profession, how to support the professional learning of teachers and teacher educators across their careers, and how to support wellbeing in education and in community. Sharon’s research expertise lies in creative research methods, self-study, and phenomenology. Dr. Lemon is a Professor and Vice-Chancellor Professoriate Research Fellow at Edith Cowan University, ...
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KDP Convo 2023 starts Thursday! If you’re joining us in St. Louis this week, we can’t wait to see you, but even if you can’t be there, you can still review our list of great Speakers , follow along on the Schedule of Events , and follow updates on Instagra m , Faceboo k , Thread s , X (formerly Twitter), and YouTub e . This week’s special Teacher Advocate article is a small collection of archival articles on just a few of the topics our Convo presenters will be discussing this week in our 67 concurrent learning sessions. Be the Thermostat: How Teachers’ ...
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By Erin Nerlino Erin wrote the article “From Heroes to Scapegoats: Teacher Perceptions of the Media and Public’s Portrayal of Teachers during COVID-10” in the latest quarterly issue of The Educational Forum. The article is available free in the month of October . It was April 2021, amidst arguably the strangest year of teaching in the profession’s history, and I was sitting in my classroom after school one day, wracking my brain about how I might attempt to review with my 11th grade AP English Language and Composition students for their upcoming AP exam. With some students Zooming into class remotely and others in person, I was chained to my computer ...
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By Joyce Wilson Teaching is a challenging profession, especially if you’re a new teacher. Fortunately, you can implement strategies to stay organized, focused, and effective in your teaching career. I’m going to share seven practical tips that can help you keep up. 1. Meet individual needs. The first step to staying organized as a teacher is to keep up with individual student needs and progress. This requires you to set up a system for tracking and monitoring individual student progress . You can use a grading system or a student monitoring tool to monitor individual student progress throughout the school year. By doing this, you’ll be able to identify ...
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The Teacher Advocate has more than 100 searchable articles on everyday topics that will always be relevant to new and returning teachers. Here are some examples of our best to give you a hand, whether you’re new to the classroom or just starting a new year! Lead to Teach: 4 Ways to Build a Positive Learning Environment By Karyn Miller “What if my students won’t listen to me? What if they won’t follow my rules?” These and other classroom management concerns are often a source of anxiety for new teachers. Whether you are a new teacher, or someone who has been in the classroom for years, the reality is that creating an environment for learning is hard ...
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By Carl Grant and Alexandra Allweisss In our article, “ 'Going for Broke': Working with Teacher Candidates to Bring about Intersectional Socially Just Teaching,” in the current issue of The Educational Forum (available free in September), we share our reflections on the current moment and what it might look like to engage collectively to teach in ways that build toward the world as “it ought to be,” through a framework of intersectional social justice and following James Baldwin’s (1963) call for educators to “go for broke.” In summer 2021, the two of us had regular conversations about our experiences as teacher educators in the ongoing wake of ...
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By Lin Wu The author wrote the article “Enacting Hip-Hop Pedagogy for Joy and Justice” in Volume 87, Issue 3 of KDP’s The Educational Forum . It is available free in the month of August. Six years after President Barack Obama left the White House, many states are actively censoring the teaching of historical truth in their K–16 institutions. The white backlash against racial progress is disturbing yet not surprising, given the racist foundations of the United States. Teacher educators who genuinely care for the profession’s sustainability are standing at the crossroads of succumbing to neofascist politics and taking up the battle against white supremacy. ...
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By Kyle L. Chong and Sheila M. Orr The authors collaborated on the article “Toward an Antiracist Pedagogy of Humanizing Co-creatorship in Teacher Education,” in Volume 87, Issue 3, of KDP’s The Educational Forum . It is available free in the month of July. Often, future teachers learn to be teachers “of” something—a secondary mathematics teacher, or an English-language educator (like we were). And, honestly, that makes a lot of sense. We want all children to be getting the best education they deserve, from people who really know their stuff. However, one policy trend we’ve recently noticed is that legislatures are taking away teachers’ decision-making ...
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By Susanne Dunn When you walk around an elementary school, you regularly see students practicing lining up properly, transitioning from rug time to desk time, responding to questions, and moving through classroom stations. Teachers create songs, mnemonics, and hand signals to help students remember routines and procedures. In my experience evaluating secondary teachers, many educators feel that such practices are either childish or that students should already have internalized these practices and should be able to handle just following simple directions when called upon to do so. Students at this age, however, need structure and routine just as much as small ...
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By Zareen Gul Aga (Rahman) The author wrote “Pre-service Mathematics Teachers’ Experience with Productive Struggle,” which is published in Volume 87, Issue 2 of the KDP Forum. It is available free in the month of June. We do our students a disservice by teaching them that the only thing of value in a mathematics classroom is the right answer. This notion promotes the view that there’s only one right way to think, a deeply troubling idea given the state of the world we live in today. Unfortunately, many students only ever experience a narrow view of mathematics that begins and ends inside the last mathematics course they enrolled in. Doing mathematics ...
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By Jacek Polubiec Most of us agree that the idea that leaders just lead, teachers just teach, and students just learn is a thing of the past. Innovative schools have been blurring these traditional boundaries for years, and most people understand that being flexible, open minded, collaborative, and proactive are critical attributes of those who want to succeed in the contemporary workplace. The expectation is that leaders distribute their influence among the staff, teachers assume roles in policy making, and students take ownership of their own learning. For the adults in the school building, this paradigm shift comes with opportunities to assume official ...
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